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Autumn 2009 @ our new website The Four Seasons of Haiku

Monday, June 8, 2009

nodding pansies pose
brightly dressed with smiling faces-
summer wid caresses our cheeks

4 comments:

K. Orlando said...

A terrific idea is to have a child record their haiku and then illustrate it in a software program. I have done just that with several elementary classes and the results are wonderful. Each child is excited to see his/her illustration and hear their haiku. This is a way for parents to hear a recording of their child's voice. We have so many papers of what our children have done in school, but probably not many audio samples.

Leatherdykeuk said...

I love this one.

I can only ever see angry faces in pansies!

Dennis Tomlinson said...

The 'smiling faces' are nice but I always think pansies are frowning at me, somewhat like Rachel's idea!

Jenn Jilks said...

Interesting points of view!

I am not sure that teachers can teach children well enough what haiku is all about. Firstly, there is the translation of the form from Japanese to English and I'm not sure I quite get it.

Haiku has such specific guides - traditional or new English forms.
I am still wrestling with putting images on - but like to include my inspiration.

challenge:
Since two of you find pansies less friendly, can you write a haiku about that?! I shall try.
Great to have kids read what they write. BTW. Excellent pedagogy.